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Ebenezer Place

Thursday 3rd September 2020

When Alexander Sinclair returned from America in 1883 he built what is now Mackays Hotel. The council instructed him to put a name on the short end of the building as they deemed it a street.





When Alexander Sinclair returned from America in 1883, having made his fortune, he built what is now Mackays Hotel. The Council of that day instructed him to put a name on the short end of the building as they deemed it a street. Hence Ebenezer Place appeared in the town’s records from 1887.

Ebenezer Place measures 2.06 metres (6 ft 9 inches) and is home to just one doorway belonging to No 1 Bistro, part of Mackays Hotel.

The street was formally recognised as a record-breaker by the Guinness Book of Records in 2006.  After 50 hours and with many detours, Craig Glenday, editor-in-chief of the Guinness Book of World Records arrived in Wick and declared a new world record one hour later!

Robert Louis Stevenson, who spent some time in Wick while his father built the new breakwater in the bay, included a reference to Ebenezer Place in his book ‘Treasure Island’ - note the reference to the 5 hand way, which is represented by Union Street, River Street, Bridge Street, Station Road and Cliff Road.

Over the years it was the door to a number of different places of business and today it provides entry into Mackays Hotel’s  No.1 Bistro.




Written by The Wick Society

The Wick Society
18 - 27 Bank Row, Wick, Caithness, KW1 5EY

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